Time must be your primary unit

Most, if not all of us, measure success, and what we strive for in the unit of money. Even if we tell ourselves we don’t think it’s the most important thing, we subconsciously do, as we think about what money allows us to do.

The primary unit of measurement defines how you think about your priorities.

While we all believe to think about money as a proxy, and means for experiences, it becomes our master when we treat it as the primary unit. There can never be enough of it – it’s the thing that supposedly enables everything.

As I was just reminded by reading ‘Digital minimalism’ by Cal Newport yesterday, we need to think about time as our primary unit. Time is the thing that doesn’t scale. Time is limited. Time is what we cannot get back. Time is when experiences happen and where they live.

Following ideas that are as old as society, we should start from time. Figure out how much money we need to optimize our time, and limit our money-creating to that. The more material stuff we have, the more money we need to keep it up. When we focus on getting a lot of money to support amazing experiences, we might end up not having enough time left to actually live those experiences.

Here is what Thoreau tells us:

“If I should sell my forenoons and afternoons to society, as most appear to do, I am sure that for me there would be nothing left worth living for…. I wish to suggest that a man may be very industrious, and yet not spend his time well. There is no more fatal blunderer than he who consumes the greater part of his life getting his living.” – Thoreau in ‘Walden’

And as always, the Chinese knew it a long time ago already:

“Those who know they have enough are rich.” – Lao Tzu

Get your primary unit straight and optimize for it!

Digital Detox

We are out on our summer trip, road-tripping with our trailer and camping out in National Parks throughout the West, and life is good. Really good!

I was reflecting a little bit on what is different, what makes this feel so much different from the daily routines we are in.

There are several things. Obviously we don’t have to work or tend to our Honey-Do lists. We are a little further away from our worries, which helps us let go of them a little more often. We are forced back to a simpler lifestyle – camping and making do with fewer things – which usually makes us happier than juggling our possessions and toys.

There are many reasons and I could go on with my (longer) list. However, I think a big one is also to disconnect. We made it a point to disconnect digitally. To focus on the here and now, and not the far away, somewhere in our ‘social’ networks, or even worse in politics (official and personal).

Being in a National Park of course helps with that. There is only one spot that has the resemblance of connectivity and you actually have to drive there, limiting it to a quick sync once a day (if you’re lucky).

There are no annoying emails, no Facebook posts that you need to keep up with, no LinkedIn, no politicking in the neighborhood, no politics, no campaigning, no news, no disasters that quite frankly are usually too far away for us to care anyway.

Instead we enjoy nature. We play with the kids, we explore. We lay low in the afternoons after exciting and busy mornings and just enjoy life. We have camp chores, but they are just a part of the natural rhythm and don’t feel forced upon or draining.

It is bliss and peace. It is being in the real world, rather than the digital. It is being in the here and now.

I made a resolution for myself, to put in a digital detox day once a week when we’re back home to preserve and recreate this feeling in ‘normal’ life. I will also try to squeeze in at least half a day of ‘do nothing’ once a week. Bring your vacation insights back into ‘normal’ life and make them return further dividends!